Category Archives: 5. Miscellaneous

Which One Is It? Me, Myself, and I

[Instructors: Download PDFs of the exercise and key at the end of this post.]

The misuse of me, myself, and I is generally caused by not understanding when to use the pronoun me. You’ve probably learned that I is always the subject of sentences–never me. Because people sometimes do not remember that fact, they overcorrect and avoid using me even when it is correct to do so. People also seem to feel more comfortable saying myself instead of me when me is actually correct. To clarify the use of the pronouns me, myself, and I, let’s review the grammatical rules for each:

The pronoun I functions as the subject of sentences.

A common mistake occurs when the subject of a sentence includes a noun and a pronoun. To test for correctness, remove the noun and examine for correctness.

My friend and I tried the paleo diet. (Me is never the subject.)

The pronoun me functions as the object of verbs and prepositions.

The most common mistake occurs when the object includes another noun plus the pronoun. Ignore the extra noun and then check for correctness.

Please call Jason and me when you arrive. (The pronoun me functions as the object of the verb call).

Send the forms to Lea and me. (The pronoun me functions as the object of the

preposition to.)

The reflexive pronoun myself must reflect on another noun or pronoun in the sentence.

The most common mistake occurs when myself is substituted for me because it seems more polite or more correct. But it isn’t!

You may give your donation either to Jon or myself me. (Never substitute myself for me. Remember that myself is correct only when it refers to a previously mentioned noun or pronoun, such as I myself am collecting donations.)

In the following sentences, choose the correct pronoun.

  1. Because we had overpaid, the IRS sent a refund check to my wife and (I, me, myself).
  1. My friend and (I, me, myself) both rejected the lentil loaf for our evening meal.
  1. Please remove the picture of my boyfriend and (I, me, myself) that appeared on your Facebook page.
  1. The employment counselor said that networking would work better for (I, me, myself) than searching the Web for a job.
  1. I was told that LinkedIn was the No. 1 social media site for (I, me, myself) to use in establishing my online presence.

In the remaining sentences, correct any errors in pronouns. Mark C if the sentence is correct.

  1. Do you know whether any messages were left for Michelle or myself?
  1. Jade and me heard that working as a freelancer or as a temporary employee is becoming more common today.
  1. I told our customer that she could always call the manager or me if she had any questions.
  1. Many complaints that were sent to Sam and I should have gone to the manufacturer instead.
  1. Can you meet my partner and myself in the baggage area as soon as our plane arrives?
  1. Your competed application form must be sent to Dr. Rivera or I before March 15.
  1. The agreement between the boss and myself was reached after my performance review.
  1. To prepare for our study abroad trip, Amanda and me took a conversational Spanish class.
  1. If the manager had just called Mike or myself, the problem could have been solved immediately.
  1. Although we are adventuresome, Rachel and me did not care for the seaweed and kale

Key

  1. Because we had overpaid, the IRS sent a refund check to my wife and me. (The pronoun me functions as the object of the preposition Ignore my wife and.)
  1. My friend and I rejected the lentil loaf for our evening meal. (The pronoun I functions as the sentence subject. Ignore My friend and.)
  1. Please remove the picture of my boyfriend and me that appeared on your Facebook page. (The pronoun me functions as the object of the preposition of. Ignore my boyfriend and.)
  1. The employment counselor said that networking would work better for me than searching the Web for a job. (The pronoun me functions as the object of the preposition for. Do not choose myself because the sentence has no pronoun or noun that it would reflect on.)
  1. I was told that LinkedIn was the No. 1 social media site for me to use in establishing my online presence. (The pronoun me functions as the object of the preposition me.)
  1. Do you know whether any messages were left for Michelle or me?
  1. Jade and I heard that working as a freelancer or as a temporary employee is becoming more common today.
  2. C.
  1. Many complaints that were sent to Sam and me should have gone to the manufacturer instead.
  1. Can you meet my partner and me in the baggage area as soon as our plane arrives?
  1. Your competed application form must be sent to Rivera or me before March 15.
  1. The agreement between the boss and me was reached after my performance review. (The preposition between requires an objective pronoun )
  1. To prepare for our study abroad trip, Amanda and I took a conversational Italian class.
  1. If the manager had just called Mike or me, the problem could have been solved immediately.
  1. Although we are adventuresome, Rachel and I did not care for the seaweed and kale smoothie.

Me,Myself,I-Key

Me, Myself, I-exercise

 

The Truth and Nothing but…Can a Type Font Kill Your Chance for an Interview?…Pre-Hire Tests Squeeze Out Young Job Seekers

The Truth and Nothing but…

If you’ve ever considering lying during the job search process—don’t. Whether you are submitting a résumé, completing an application, or interviewing, employers want to hire people they can trust. The author of backgroundchecks.com lists reasons you should stick to the truth.shutterstock_98908853

  1. Background checks are standard and will reveal any criminal offenses. Although you may not get the job if you state a legal problem upfront, you certainly won’t get the job if you’ve lied about it and are caught.
  1. References will reveal lies such as incorrect or padded job titles, responsibilities, and employment dates.
  1. Skills you cannot demonstrate will eventually turn into an embarrassing situation. At best, you’ll be in over your head. At worst, lying about your qualifications can get you fired.                                                                                                                                                                                       From the Los Angeles Times

Can a Type Font Kill Your Chance for an Interview?

True or false: Times New Roman is the standard for résumés. If you answered “true,” you may be hurting your chance of landing an interview.

According to typography experts, using the venerable Times New Roman on your résumé is “the equivalent of wearing sweatpants to an interview.” A creative director for a design firm considers use of the font indicative of a candidate who has put no thought into the résumé’s appearance.

What to do? Use Helvetica for a safe, more business-like look. Garamond is another good choice. Avoid flowery or cursive fonts. As for Comic Sans—using it will definitely leave you sans an interview!

                                                                                                                               From PayScale

Pre-Hire Tests Squeeze Out Young Job Seekers

As more and more businesses use pre-hiring assessments, those who don’t score well are increasingly finding themselves out of luck.

In 2013, 57 percent of US employers used pre-hiring assessment tools, up from 26 percent in 2001. Unfortunately, the tests are making it especially hard for young job seekers to land a position. Many companies are simply not settling for workers with minimal skills or whose “workplace temperament” as measured by the tests do not auger well.

Besides personality tests, new hires are facing assessments that also check for poor credit. The result is that fewer individuals make the cut. Since the tests seem to improve turnover and productivity, it seems likely employers will continue using them.

                                                                                                                              From The Wall Street Journal

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