Category Archives: 4. Classroom Exercises

Slanguage: Not for Use at Work

[Instructors: Download PDFs of this exercise and solution at the end of the post.]

Everyone uses slang, especially when speaking to peers. While slang can create unity and community among peers, it can also alienate those who are not part of the in-group and affect how others view your professionalism.

Below are ten sentences containing popular millennial slang words. Rewrite the sentences to sound more appropriate for the workplace.

Word Definition Used in Sentence
lit amazing Did you see how Dipali made that sale? That was so lit.
trash terrible, worthy of being thrown out That email from HR about the increase in our co-pay was trash.
cancel(led) to reject a person, place, or thing Just because Mateo criticized your report in the meeting, you can’t cancel him.
drag to rake someone through the coals; burn someone I’m going to drag Ellen to the ground after she left me to clean up the office kitchen.
woke being aware You need to stay woke when Michelle sends out those meeting reminders.
savage hard core Did you hear that Su-lin stayed up all night to make that deadline? That’s just savage.
sic cool We made the sales goal! That’s sic!
hardcore intense (can be used as a positive or negative) Mireya is so hardcore she finished that brief in one day. Brendan got laid off. That is hardcore.
live cool/exciting or extreme/intense The intercultural training session was way live.

Miranda was way too live during that meeting.

excluded from this narrative negative response to a request Jean asked me to show the new dude the office, but I’m so busy I want to be excluded from that narrative.

Key to Slanguage: Not for Use at Work

Slanguage Sentence Standard English Sentence
Did you see how Dipali made that sale? That was so lit. Did you see how Dipali made that sale? That was impressive!
That email from HR about the increase in our co-pay was trash. That email from HR about the increase in our co-pay was upsetting.
Just because Mateo criticized your report in the meeting, you can’t cancel him. Just because Mateo criticized your report in the meeting, you can’t ignore him.
I’m going to drag Ellen to the ground after she left me to clean up the office kitchen. After Ellen left me to clean up the office kitchen, I’m going to suggest we put up a sign reminding people to do their own dishes.
You need to stay woke when Michelle sends out those meeting reminders. You should pay attention when Michelle sends out those meeting reminders.
Did you hear that Su-lin stayed up all night to make that deadline? That’s just savage. Did you hear that Su-lin stayed up all night to make that deadline? That’s dedication!
We made the sales goal! That’s sic! We made the sales goal! That’s phenomenal!
Mireya is so hardcore she finished that brief in one day.

Brendan got laid off. That is hardcore.

Mireya is so diligent she finished that brief in one day.

Brendan got laid off. That is awful.

The intercultural training session was way live.

Miranda was way too live during that meeting.

The intercultural training session was really interesting.

Miranda was way too intense during that meeting.

Jean asked me to show the new dude the office, but I’m so busy I want to be excluded from that narrative. Jean asked me to show the new guy the office, but I’m so busy I’d rather skip it.

Slanguage Exercise

Key to Slanguage

Evaluating Teaching on Your Terms: Course Experience Assignment

Standardized student evaluations are full of problems. Administrators can ascribe too much weight to them. Students may lash out inappropriately. Female instructors tend to be more harshly rated than males.

However, instructors may wish to administer their own course review before students complete standardized evaluations by assigning a course experience evaluation. A course experience evaluation moves away from summative questions, which focus on instructor characteristics (Was the teacher organized? Was the material explained clearly?) to experiential questions, which focus on how students experience a course.

Using instructor-created course experience evaluations has several advantages. By designing questions that encourage students to think critically about course content and their own performance, instructors gain valuable input about the class’s perceptions and experiences. That information can help instructors adjust teaching strategies the next time the course is taught.

In addition, once students have reflected deeply about their experience in the course, that analysis prompts more thoughtful responses when they do respond to standardized evaluations. While this approach doesn’t guarantee better scores, at the very least these reflections offer a different set of evaluative information.

Use the following tips to administer an instructor-generated course experience assignment.

  • Introduce the task by telling students they will answer questions only they can answer as members of the course. Doing so will encourage students to take the assignment seriously.
  • Tell students you will use their responses to make you a teacher who helps future students learn more effectively. Thinking about how others may benefit from their comments can focus student responses to provide helpful input rather than simplistic criticism.
  • Decide if you want the task performed in class or as homework. If the writing is to be completed during class time, have students print the assignment and put it in your mailbox or office later. If the assignment is done as homework, ask students to bring a printed, unnamed response to turn in on a day of your choosing.

The prompt below offers various ways for students to think about the class they are leaving and provides instructors with more meaningful information than standardized evaluations do. Download a PDF of the exercise here.


End-of-Semester Course Experience Assignment

Your insights about your learning experience in this course can help me see our class from your side of the desk. Please respond to any three of the statements below (more if you’d like.) Submit these anonymously; I will use them as I plan my courses for next semester.

In this course …

  • what most helped my learning of the content was when…because…
  • my learning of the content would have benefited if…because…
  • the assignment that contributed the most to my learning was… because…
  • the reading that contributed the most to my learning was… because…
  • the kinds of homework tasks that contributed most to my learning were…because…
  • the approach I took to my own learning that I benefited from the most was…because…
  • the biggest obstacle for me in my learning the material was… because…
  • I was most willing to take risks with learning new material when… because…
  • on the first day, I remember thinking…because…

What is something covered in this course material that you can do now that you could not do? Anything you did not fully understand at the beginning of our class?

 

Blowing Away Puffed-Up Résumés

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Although today’s competitive workplace may make you think about exaggerating or even outright lying on your résumé, doing so is not just unethical—it leads to the humiliation of exposure, and in many cases, never being considered for the position to which you’ve applied. Such lies or exaggerations are also grounds for termination. If terminated for being caught in a résumé lie, the lie would come back to haunt you when it is exposed during a new reference check.

With a classmate, consider some of the ways job seekers might lie on their résumés and complete the table.

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Instructors: Download a blank table and a solution here.