Hey, Be Nice!… Geography Determines Dress Code… Female Millennial Workers Suffer from Depression, Burnout

Hey, Be Nice!

Bad manners in the workplace undermine collaboration, according to new research published in the Harvard Business Review. The rude behaviors that ruptured teamwork included belittling and demeaning comments, insults, and backbiting. Even those who weren’t the direct objects of the nastiness were less confident and helpful as a result of the incivility that infected the group.

The study followed two teams, one of which received neutral messages about its work, and another, which received insulting comments about its work. The team that felt the brunt of the rude remarks ranked lower in each performance metric primarily because group members stopped sharing information and didn’t seek help from teammates.

Teams work best in an environment of trust and respect, in which individuals feel safe to accept feedback and take risks. When the opposite occurs, the ensuing negativity tends to be repeated in subsequent collaborative efforts.

From Harvard Business Review

Geography Determines Dress Code

When JPMorgan Chase and Co. recently changed its dress code, CEO Jamie Dimon admitted that the organization’s business formal rules were out of date. Indeed, the workplace has entered a new era where employees wearing hoodies and flip flops are just as likely to be seen as staff in a suit and tie, according to research conducted by Payscale.

The survey results found that dress code formality depended on the type of business being surveyed. Nearly one half of those questioned said the company had an explicit dress code, which included companies that require uniforms. More than 42 percent said their organization allowed employees to look any way they chose, but “within reason,” a consciously vague term.

Interestingly, the research found that the closer a company is to the West Coast, the more casual the dress code. The Southeastern states have the most explicit dress codes, many requiring uniforms.

From Payscale.com

Female Millennial Workers Suffer from Depression, Burnout

 Depression among all millennials is prevalent, but more female millennial employees experience depression and burnout than their male counterparts. However, stigmas surrounding mental health issues make the women less likely to seek help. The reason? While employees would not hesitate to request time off to recover from strep throat, they are less likely to ask for a mental health day for fear of appearing weak to their employers.

The non-profit organization Mental Health America reports that depression costs the U.S. economy over $51 billion in absenteeism and $26 billion in treatment costs each year. However, experiencing stress and depression not only causes absenteeism; it also affects presenteeism, which occurs when a depressed employee comes to work but does not operate at full throttle.

From MarketWatch

 

 

 

 

 

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